News

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Posted 9/20/2012 9:54pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

Farm News

It’s in the air: that certain crisp smell, the clarity of light, the ease of breathing dryness.  Fall is here.  You can feel it.  You can sense it in the animals around the farm.  This week, a rash of hummingbirds appeared at the hummingbird feeder, all fighting for a spot to drink nectar. They seem to spend more time fighting each other than feeding.  There have been a few monarch butterflies hovering around the flowers, as they stock up on reserves to sustain them on their southbound journey.  I’ve also noticed that the praying mantises are abundant once more; it’s strange how I only see them as summer is waning and fall is waxing. 

New England Asters

The grain farmers have started harvesting corn this week.  The combines are rolling down the roads, but I don’t see the usual back and forth grain truck traffic associated with many trips needed to take the harvest to the grain elevator. There’s lots of talk on the commodity reports about checking for aflatoxin in corn this year-it’s a toxin associated with a black mold;  another insult to the injury of a poor corn harvest.  I’ve been watching the sharp-shinned hawks hover over the newly harvested corn fields on the prowl for rodents, now easy to spot in the skimpy corn stubble.

The goats sense fall is in the air too. The bucks are all too eager to watch the milkers parade into the milk parlor every evening, curling their lips to catch any scents that might indicate that the does are coming into heat.  Soon, they will be able to satiate their desires when breeding season begins. The milkers are ever more reluctant to rise from their slumber in the morning and waddle into the milking parlor.  It’s dark now at 5:30AM, so, really, who wants to get out bed?  We too are finding it ever more difficult to leave the comfort of the covers and rise to meet the days’ challenges.  The desire for hibernation grows stronger and stronger. I’m holding it back for the time being.

Farmers’ Markets

We’re attending three farmers’ markets this Saturday, September 22nd: Urbana, Springfield and Chicago’s Green City Market. For our Springfield patrons, we’re the featured farmer for the Springfield Slow Food Convivium this week, so if you’re a Slow Food member, please come out and see us this Saturday.  We’ve got some great cheese for you:

  • Fresh Chevre—plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper and a few heirloom tomato
  • Most of our bloomy rind cheeses including: Little Bloom on the Prairie, Black Goat, Ewe Bloom, Black Sheep
  • Sheep Milk Feta
  • Moonglo
  • Roxanne
  • Huckleberry Blue—we are now cutting into our last wheels so this cheese will be around for another week or two. It’s more aged, drier and more crumbly than earlier in the season—perfect for a salad or to crumble on a pizza (try caramelized onion, Huckleberry Blue and chevre on a pizza-yum!!)
  • Mollisol Pecorino Romano (these are the last few wedges of this sharp and flavorful grating cheese as well)

For our Urbana shoppers, don’t let fall deter you from stocking up on pints of our goat milk gelato and sorbetto. We’ve been tweaking the recipes for the Anise Hyssop and the Cardamom, resulting in a lot more flavor. If you like these exotic flavors, I encourage you to give them a try.

We’ve also got:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Espresso
  • Rhubarb Swirl
  • Stracciatella (fancy chocolate ganache chip)
  • Thai Basil
  • Ginger
  • Concord Grape Sorbetto
  • Pear Sorbetto

Fall is a great time to shop the farmers' markets, so come out and support your local farmers!

Posted 9/17/2012 2:50pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

Hello Bread, Cheese and Gelato CSA members:

It is time again for another allotment of bread, cheese and/or gelato. As most of you know by now, Pickup in Peoria is from 5 to 6PM at Marcella Teplitz' house. Pickup in Bloomington is at the Unitarian Church parking lot off Emerson Street from 6 to 7PM. Carissa Katic will be at the Bloomington location this week. She will bring extras of bread, cheese and gelato (to Bloomington only) so if you know of folks who would like to get some of these items, please let them know.  As always, if you can't pick up your share this week, please let us know who will be picking it up for you and provide a phone number for them.

Thank you for your patronage.

leslie & Carissa

Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery and Katic Breads

Posted 9/13/2012 11:05pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

Farm news

We baled our fourth cutting of alfalfa today. The fourth cutting is typically the most palatable as the stems are small and the leaves are plentiful.  Raising perfect hay is a difficult proposition in the now humid, early fall Midwest.  It's part art and part science to know when to cut it, know when to rake it and finally to know when to bale it.  The shorter days and cooler mornings of early September make lots of dew. The dew slows down the drying process; the upshot is that you need even more rain-free days in the fall to complete the process. In an ideal hay world, you would get a full four to five days to cut, rake, bale and load the hay into the barn.  This almost never happens, yet the forecast for the week showed no rain for about five days.  Wes and Ben cut the fields on Monday and let it dry for a day before raking it yesterday. This morning it was at the perfect moisture level for baling.  Since our old (it's a lemon let's face it) New Holland baler has been on the fritz for over a year, we have been hiring out the baling part of hay making, leaving us at the mercy of someone else with different priorities.  So, of course he called early this morning to tell us that he was a day behind in his other baling jobs and couldn't come out today as we had planned.  We knew we couldn't wait another day because a) rain was headed our way later today/tonight and b) the hay looked so perfect on the ground RIGHT now.  So, what to do? Our local implement dealer just happened to have a used baler for rent, so we were back in business by 11AM this morning. Wes was on the baler, while Ben and I picked up the bales from the field. I got to drive the truck with trailer in tow, as Ben walked down the rows and tossed the bales onto the trailer.  With the radio blaring old time jazz tunes (wouldn't you know, one of most favorite songs "there ain’t nobody here but us chickens" came on the radio!! How perfect is that?), I crept along the now clean field, stopping to let Ben rearrange the bales on the trailer. It's a true sense of satisfaction to watch the bales get stacked high on the trailer and then bring them back to the barn.  The intensity of green is so strong, you need sunglasses to look at this hay. It is alfalfa at its best. The ultimate test of perfection is watching the girls bury their heads in the hay feeder.  The normally rambunctious doelings who usually whine and complain even after you feed them their grain were silent. It was the silence of sheer food enjoyment.

doelings enjoying hay

Farmers’ Markets, Cheese and  Gelato

This weekend we’re attending three farmers’ markets: Urbana and Green City Market on Saturday and Logan Square on Sunday. The weather forecast is calling for blue skies and crisp cool fall weather, perfect for patronizing your favorite farmers’ market. We have a great line up of cheese for you, including:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herbs de Provence and heirloom tomato
  • An assortment of bloomy rind cheeses including Angel Food, Little Bloom on the Prairie, Black Sheep (and maybe Black Goat) and Ewe Bloom
  • Sheep milk feta
  • Roxanne
  • Moonglo
  • Huckleberry Blue
  • Mollisol Pecorino

Urbana market goers can enjoy some great gelato flavors this week:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Rhubarb Swirl
  • Stracciatella
  • Espresso
  • Anise Hyssop
  • Cardamom
  • Thai Basil
  • Rhubarb sorbetto
  • Concord grape sorbetto
  • Pear sorbetto
Posted 9/6/2012 7:24pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

Farm News

This year's drought has made its permant and devastating mark on grain agriculture here in the heart of the Midwest. If you live in the belly of cash grain country like we do, you hear the daily "Commodity Report" commentators on Public Radio stations lamenting the recent rains as "too little too late." You see, grains like corn and soybeans have distinct life cycle events (pollination, grain fill are two big ones) that occur at fixed times, set by the crop's internal biological clock.  So, when pollination is in motion after so many days following germination, if soil moisture is lacking or air temperatures hover in the 100's, corn pollen from the tassels just has a real hard time fertilizing the ear, the female flowering part of the plant.  Even if you're lucky enough to get male and female corn flowers to come together, prolonged lack of rain means those ears won't fill with nice juicy corn kernels (the fertilized part of the female corn flower).  To add insult to injury, if these critical life cycle events happen during the height of a drought, and then you get some nice soaking rains like we have had over the past couple of weeks, the corn ear is done--no rain can make those kernels fill after a certain point in the corn plant's life cycle.

Contrast this scenario with a perennial crop like alfalfa.  Alfalfa's roots burrow deep into the soil, able scavengers of scarce soil moisture.  When moisture is lacking, the alfalfa hunkers down and goes into survival mode. When moisture is replenished, as is the case with the plentiful rains that Hurricane Isaac dropped on us last weekend (we received over 5 1/2 inches of the wet stuff), the alfalfa plants have a flexible biological clock. They are poised to take up that soil moisture and turn it into lush green growth. Notice the contrast of intense green alfalfa with the brown and withering corn in the background. 

alfalfa revival

This resiliant crop is well adapted to erratic changes in our weather. This means we will get a fourth cutting of alfalfa hay that will surpass the first three cuttings in both quantity AND quality.  Let's put our hands together for perennial crops--our goats will be enjoying this gorgeous hay next spring when their babies start dropping. Viva la resilience!

Farmers' Markets and Ewe Bloom Cheese

This Saturday, September 8th, we're attending three farmers' markets: Urbana, Springfield and Chicago's Green City Market.  As usual, we'll be bringing a wide assortment of our cheeses, but I want to give a special mention to one of our soft-ripened sheep milk cheeses, "Ewe Bloom." 

Ewe Bloom

Many of our customers who are new to the world of bloomy rind cheeses, might be intimidated by Ewe Bloom at first blush and first sniff. Its rind is colonized by a white mold that imparts an mushroomy and yeasty aroma. The outer edges of the cheese have a slight ooziness that many a bloomy rind cheese lover pine for.The body or paste of the cheese is slightly "sheepy"--BUT, not in a bad way. By sheepy, I mean, grassy and earthy with hints of lanolin.  The mouth feel and finish of this cheese is best described as buttery.  It is best to "temper" the cheese before you eat it; let it come to close to room temperature. I like to serve it on crusty bread like baguette. You can compliment the cheese's flavors with something sweet-tart like an apricot jam.  If you haven't tried Ewe Bloom yet this season, I encourage you to buy some and give it a chance.  It's a great cheese, once you get to know it. We will also have:

  • Plenty of fresh chevre--plain, herbs de Provence and heirloom tomato (it's back after a short hiatus)
  • An assortment of other bloomy rind cheeses including Angel Food, Little Bloom on the Prairie, Black Goat and limited quantities of Krotovina. Krotovina is going on fall vacation, so you won't see it for awhile.
  • Sheep Milk Feta
  • Moonglo
  • Roxanne
  • Huckleberry Blue
  • Mollisol Pecorino Romano

Our Urbana shoppers can choose from an assortment of gelato flavors this Saturday, including:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Stracciatella
  • Thai Basil
  • Espresso
  • Ginger
  • Cardamom (new flavor!!)
  • Anise Hyssop (new flavor!!)
  • Pear Rosemary & Thyme Sorbetto
  • Rhubarb Sorbetto

In addition to the cheeses and gelato flavors on offer, we will also have more of our light and floral farmstead honey for sale in both 8 oz. and 16 oz. glass jars. The weather should be perfect for farmers' market shopping on Saturday, so come on out and stock up on all your local foods.

Posted 8/30/2012 10:25pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

The buzz around central Illinois these past couple of days isn't the drone of the cicadas or katydids.  It's all about the impending deluge of rain we're expecting this weekend as remnants of Hurricane (now "tropical storm") Isaac make their way northward along the Mississippi watershed.  It's hard to contemplate that two plus weeks ago we were begging for a few drops of the wet stuff.  Now, we are battening down the hatches, shoring up the walls along the goat barns so they don't flood, harvesting all the tomatoes before they are jostled from their vines and digging the potatoes that have been resting underground so they don't rot. Some forecasts are calling for upwards of 6 inches of rain over a 24-hour period. Some say the heaviest rain will fall just south of us, dropping "only" 2 to 4 inches here.  While we do need rain, we don't need this quantity over such a short period of time--pretty please??

We're hoping, at least, that the rains hold off for the farmers' markets on Saturday morning. We're attending both Urbana's Market at the Square and Green City Market that day.  We're also hoping the rains peter out by the time they get to Chicago, so you Sunday Farmers' Market shoppers at Logan Square can come out to get your weekly groceries of local foods including our cheeses. We haven't been to Logan Square for awhile, so we are especially eager to greet our customers there.  We're not going to let the weathermen deter us from setting up our tents and putting out our cheese wares. In fact, we've got a great line up of cheeses for you this weekend:

  • Plenty of fresh chevre--plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper (still no heirloom tomato, but it will return)
  • An assortment of bloomy rind cheeses-let us surprise you!
  • Sheep milk feta-perfect for a feta-watermelon salad
  • Moonglo
  • Roxanne
  • Huckleberry Blue (it's getting a bit sharper and more crumbly, but it is still delicious)
  • Mollisol Pecorino

Urbana market goers can stock up on pints of gelato this week:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Margot's Mint
  • Stracciatella
  • Lemon Verbena-Thyme
  • Espresso (it will wake you up!)
  • Hazelnut
  • Ginger

Sorbetto Flavors include:

  • Concord Grape
  • Watermelon
  • Pear-Rosemary-Thyme

Put on your raincoat, slip on your rubber boots, grab an umbrella and come to the markets this weekend to relish in the rain and the rainbow of local foods!


Posted 8/24/2012 7:40am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

Cheese and Farm News

I can't deny the excitement that comes when you win a prize.  So, imagine our amazement and joy a couple of weeks ago, when the winners of the American Cheese Society Annual Cheese Competition were announced in Raleigh, North Carolina, and we heard via texts and tweets that our "black sheep" had won first place in the category of soft-ripened cheese made from sheep or mixed milks.  There are many categories for entry, as there are many styles of cheese and several types of milk from which the cheeses can be made. We don't know how many entries were in this specific category, but we do know that soft-ripened cheeses are competitive. It was late on a Friday afternoon, and Alison and Nat, our cheese makers, happened to still be at the farm tending their garden when I got the message. I ran outside trying to find them, and discovered them also trying to get word of the judging results.  We were stunned, AND happy!

blue ribbon chese

So, we want to share with you our pride and joy this weekend: black sheep.  For those of you not familiar with the cheese, it is a soft-ripened (aka bloomy rind) sheep milk cheese aged with an ash-salt mixture on the rind. The delicate white mold grows over the ash coating, resulting in pale grey hue to the rind. The taste is somewhat earthy and grassy.  Enjoy it with some sparkling wine (we toasted it with some bubbly) and a nice crusty bread this weekend.

Markets

We're attending three farmers' markets this Saturday: Urbana, Green City Market and Springfield. In addition to the black sheep, we'll have:

  • Lots of fresh chevre--plain, herbs de Provence and cracked pepper (sorry, no tomato this week--I need to dry some more Juliettes)
  • Sheep milk feta
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie
  • Black Goat (the goat milk version of black sheep)
  • Ewe Bloom (close cousin to black sheep, sans ash)
  • Krotovina (half sheep, half goat with an ash layer--beautiful to look at and eat)
  • Moonglo
  • Roxanne
  • Pecorino Romano
  • Huckleberry Blue

The weather will be perfect for gelato in Urbana, but don't forget to bring a cooler or ice pack to keep those pints cold on your way home:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Hazelnut Crocante (a brittle made with hazelnuts blended into the Hazelnut gelato--double the deliciousness)
  • Margot's Mint
  • Stracciatella (fancy chocolate chip)
  • Blackberry Cream
  • Lemon Verbena-Thyme
  • Peaches & Cream
  • Rhubarb sorbetto (returns after a summer hiatus)
  • Cucumber lime mint sorbetto
  • Autumn Berry sorbetto (a new flavor made with wild harvested autumn berries from tiny greens farm in urbana-check it out!)

Other news

We had our last summer open house this past Wednesday, and it was a roaring success. Thank you to all our patrons who came out to the farm this summer. It was a lot of fun for us, and we hope you enjoyed hanging out at the farm on Wednesday afternoons, even through the extreme heat days.  We'll keep you posted about other events on the farm as they arise.

Posted 8/21/2012 9:07pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

Our last farm open house of the summer is tomorrow afternoon, August 22nd from 4 to 6PM. We'll have all the usual suspects: cheese, gelato, eggs, honey as well as our regular farmer/artisan guests: Stewart's Artisan Breads, Tomahnous Farm and Laurence Mate, the knife sharpening dude.  We'll also have our last u-pick of blackberries.  Here's a very satisfied customer whose face speaks volumes to the deliciousness of the berries (followed by some delicious chocolate gelato). 

blackberry baby

If her face isn't temptation enough, here are some of the gelato flavors we'll have available for single servings tomorrow (plus many more flavors to purchase as pints).

  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Mint
  • Stracciatella (chocolate ganache "chip")
  • Lemon Verbena-Thyme

We've got some new fruit sorbetto flavors for you to try including "Autumn Berry."  So, come on out.

On another note, for those of you who tried to get seats to the fall farm dinners, and were not successful, I am sorry. I know some of you experienced some technical difficulties on the website. There was a lot of traffic on the website when  the seats became available at 5PM yesterday, and there were not that many seats for each dinner (we usually post only 40 seats per dinner).  All I can say is, that we are working to make the process easier and as fair as we possibly can.  I will let you all know as improvements are made.  Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Posted 8/16/2012 8:10pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

Farm News

It rained. It really rained--2.5 inches in about three hours kind of rain; daytime sky black as night kind of rain; barn flooded kind of rain.  It came so fast and so furious that even the ingrained manure stains on the concrete walkway between the barn and the milking parlor were washed clean. The first flush of rain caught me in the kid barn during the mid-day feeding.  As I waited for the storm to abate, I watched the rain seep into the barn underneath the metal siding. Frustrating since Ben had just finished cleaning out the barn, and it looked so beautifully clean (and dry). I was able to dart from the kid barn to the house in between storm waves. As the next wave hit and the wind gusts hurled the raindrops sideways, I watched a tiny hummingbird battle the breeze, clinging to the perch of the nectar feeder I had put out for them just yesterday.

The intensity of green that now envelopes the farm reminds me of the deep pea-green of Fuji chrome color slide film (for those of you old enough to remember slides, and slide film). We can almost hear the alfalfa shoot up in response to all that soil moisture, pushing its way toward a respectable fourth cutting.  The tomatoes will surely split with that onslaught of moisture, but that's ok.

Farmers' Markets

This weekend, we're down to only one farmers' market: Urbana.  Unfortunately, we won't be attending the Sunday Logan Square Farmers' Market (so sorry Chicago customers), but we hope to be back there in a couple of weeks. Green City Market is closed due to the Chicago Air Show.  For our Urbana market goers (and we hope there are lots of you), we have a full house of cheese to offer you:

  • Fresh chevre-plain, herbs de Provence, heirloom tomato
  • LOTS of bloomy rind cheeses including the return of Little Bloom on the Prairie (YAY!), Ewe Bloom, Black Goat, Black Sheep and Krotovina
  • Sheep Milk Feta
  • Moonglo
  • Roxanne
  • Huckleberry Blue (the last batch)
  • Mollisol Pecorino Romano

We've got a dozen or so flavors of gelato for you to enjoy as well:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Margot's Mint
  • Blackberry Cream
  • Lemon Verbena-Thyme
  • Thai Basil
  • Peaches & Cream (our Peach sorbetto swirled with our vanilla gelato--YUM)
  • Sorbettos: Cucumber-l.ime-mint; Peach, Nectarine and Concord Grape (it's beautiful to look at as well as delicious)

We've also got some of our farmstead honey for you to buy--both 8 oz. and 16 oz. jars. It's light and floral and ever so good with most of our cheeses.

Farm Dinner Reservations and Summer Open House News

Many of you have been inquiring about the next release of farm dinner reservations. The seats will go on sale through our website on Monday, August 20th at 5PM. You won't be able to make reservations before then, but you can read the descriptions and familiarize yourself with the process.  To make reservations, just go to the Dinner Season part of our website and either click on "Show Clix" or scroll down to the dinner of your choice. They sell out very quickly, so I recommend being poised at your computer at 5PM.  Our last summer farm open house of the season will be next Wednesday, August 22nd from 4 to 6PM. We hope to still have blackberries for you to pick, but stay tuned for updates next Tuesday. It's hard to believe the summer is waning. It's been one for the record books, for sure.

Posted 8/14/2012 7:21pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

There are only two more summer open houses (tomorrow and next Wednesday), so if you haven't come out to the farm this summer, you should. There's a color of green emerging from the ground that we haven't seen for quite some time. The latest round of small rains is reviving our grasses and other living plants.  The cool late summer breezes are wonderful. Come out to the farm tomorrow from 4 to 6PM to experience the lushness of late summer and enjoy some locally grown products. We'll have plenty of cheese for you to try and buy, our farmstead honey, a few dozen eggs and gelato:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate*
  • Mint
  • Hazelnut
  • Rhubarb Swirl
  • Blackberry Cream
  • Lemon Verbena-thyme*
  • Thai Basil*
  • Peach sorbetto*
  • Nectarine sorbetto
  • Cucumber lime mint sorbetto

Laurence, the knife dude, will be here to sharpen your knives.  Stewart's Artisan Breads will have a nice assortment of breads, bagels, biscotti and granola for sale. Tomahnous Farm will have some great summer tomatoes, okra, summer squash and other summer veggies.  

This  might be our last week for UPICK blackberries, so if you really want some, come out from 4 to 6PM.  We provide all the picking supplies--buckets, pint containers, etc. Price is $4 per pint.  The berry patch is on the north end of our farm, so we recommend parking in the field to the north of our driveway (just past our neighbor's brick house) where you will see a silver hoop barn. Pull in there and just walk east to the berry field (you will see Wes out there).  You can pick berries and then drive back over to the farm to see the goats and buy some cheese, gelato and other goodies.

Posted 8/9/2012 10:28pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

Farm News

Sometimes, you just have to stop what you're doing on the farm and take off for an adventure. It was Nat's birthday today, one of our cheesemakers, so we got everyone to finish up early (well, sort of) and we piled in our vehicles with fixins for a cookout in tow and headed west to Moraine View State Park. It's a beautiful wooded oasis that sits on a glacial moraine about 40 miles west of Champaign. There's a small, clear spring-fed lake in the middle of the park. It's perfect for a swim.

As an easterner who grew up practically living in some body of water in the summer (ocean, lake, pool--whatever), it is hard for me to NOT slither my body into open water all summer. We arrived at the park and started to unload our coolers and set up the grill for a cook out.  The sky to the northwest looked a bit ominous, and we soon learned that a fairly large thunderstorm cell was bee-lining it for Moraine View State Park, but the water beckoned me and I was compelled to get in.  The sensation of slightly cool water enveloping your skin is hard to beat. After a few laps in the refreshing lake, the food was ready. We all sat down to a small feast of summer salads (including a multi-colored tomato salad with all the rainbow colors of our heirloom tomatoes, some fresh basil and our sheep milk feta-of course) and burgers and brats from Triple S Farm.  As the sky darkened overhead, we could see what was coming, so we sang "happy birthday" really fast, and then headed for the cars as the large raindrops covered the picnic table.  Within ten minutes, the storm had passed. We emerged from our vehicles, headed back into the water and then ate a few birthday chocolate fudge cupcakes.  It was a grand adventure.

I have captured a stormy sky that passed over the farm late last week on our camera and created a little slide show for you to enjoy. You can find under our website heading "The Experience" then click on Anatomy of a Summer Storm. The color of the sky is remarkable.

This Saturday, August 11th, we're attending three farmers' markets: Urbana, Green City Market and Srpingfield.  We have lots of great cheese for you this weekend, including our summer tomato chevre and our American Cheese Society's Award-winning Black Sheep.  Our Angel Food and Little Bloom on the Prairie are still on a little summer holiday, but they promise to return to the cheese line up next week some time. We do have plenty of Ewe Bloom and Black Goat to satisfy your needs for bloomy rind cheese. We've got lots of our tangy and slightly salty feta with which you can adorn your salads.  AND,,, don't forget our raw milk cheeses, including Roxanne, Moonglo, Huckleberrry Blue  and Pecorino Romano.

Urbana shoppers will be treated to the main gelato maker himself, Stewart Pequinot--hawking a variety of flavors including:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Lemon Verbena-Thyme
  • Blackberry Cream
  • Margot's Mint
  • Nectarine Sorbetto
  • (and probably a few others)

I know many of you are eagerly awaiting the release of the tickets for the fall dinner dates. They will be going on sale on Monday, August 20th at 5PM. Hopefully, most of you will be back from summer vacations by then, with your hand poised on your mouse. Stay tuned for more details sometime next week. Also, we had a great turnout for farm open house and blackberry picking. If we have enough berries next Wednesday, we'll do it again. I will let you all know next Tuesday.