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Posted 11/3/2016 9:19pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

I continue to be amazed by the degree to which human lives are intertwined with goats. Yes, our agrarian ties go back millennia. Yes, most cultures across all continents derive a multitude of benefits from their husbandry: milk, fiber, meat, companionship.  These human-caprine relationships are marvelous but expected.  Even the quotidian yet intimate bonds with our milkers are ordinary in the scheme of dairy farming.

So, I’ve been intrigued by the “curse of the billy goat” that has hung over the Chicago Cubs for over 100 years.  It amazes me that folks kept goats routinely in the city of Chicago back then. Yet, how could a stinky male goat be let into a ball park in the first place?  How could a man-goat relationship hold such weight to provoke a curse on a baseball team? How could this curse exert such power for so long? How could generations of fans hold on to this superstition, some even taking it to their graves?  

I understand superstitions and baseball curses.  I grew up with them, from my old-country grandparents to the bambino curse of my beloved Boston Red Sox.  As the Cubs clinched the National League Playoffs and the World Series were in their sights, the fans began to taunt the goat, to stand up to the curse. We got emails from fraternity boys wanting to bring goats to their frat house.  We got special requests from fans daring to eat goat cheese during the games.  Then, last night happened: nothing short of a miracle (and plenty of grit and moxie from their inspiring team) come-back from losing three games, and pull-out in the 10th inning after a rainstorm to win the game by one run!  We are all Cubs fans today, as we rejoice in the lifting of the billy goat curse.  Chicago, raise your crackers full of chevre with pride! The goat-human bond is restored to its rightful place.

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand is now closed as we get to work on renovations and decorating for the holidays. We plan to re-open with a special “soft” opening on Wednesday afternoon, November 16th.  Stay tuned for details as they unfold.

Fall Classes and Workshops:  Spaces are filling up for our cheese making and cheese appreciation classes.  We are offering a couple of all-day cheese making classes and a couple of Wednesday evening workshops on understanding cheese and cheese pairings.  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. The all-day, cheese-making classes (November 13th and December 11th) are limited to 7 participants, and the other classes will involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too. 

Small Dairy Intensive: We’re partnering with The Land Connection to offer an all-day workshop on starting a small-scale dairy in Illinois (Sunday December 4th). For those of you thinking you’d like to milk cows or goats or even sheep and sell farmstead dairy products (including raw milk) legally and safely in Illinois, this workshop is for you. Most of the presenters are dairy farmers who are already doing it successfully.  Check out the details and register now! Space is limited. 

Market News Saturday, November 5th is the last outdoor market in Urbana. Thereafter, we move inside Lincoln Square Mall for the “Market in the Square.” The weather is shaping up to be a glorious fall day, so come support the farmers who work so hard to bring you the finest produce and local foods in central Illinois.   Here’s the selection of cheeses we have to offer you this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine; tangy and crumbly, it compliments any roasted fall vegetables you care to try it with. 
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style- young, but starting to get a nice gooey layer on the edges—just how I like it.
  • Black Goat: our ash-ripened bloomy rind is back—fudgy and dense, it’s simply delicious. This is the last batch of the season.
  • Snow Fog: our slow-fermented jersey-milk bloomy rind, made in the style of a chaource (similar to the traditional camembert from Normandy France).  This is our late fall-winter alternative to the goat milk bloomies. It is made differently than our Little Bloom on the Prairie, and the rich yellow Jersey cow milk from Kilgus Farmstead makes a decadently dense bloomy.  We have a few this week, and more to come in subsequent weeks.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors.

Gelato: The flavors just keep on coming:

  • Vanilla
  • Lemon verbena
  • Chocolate
  • Bourbon peach sorbetto
  • Blackberry cream
  • Ginger (made with local ginger from Big Thorn Farm in Georgetown IL)
  • Espresso
  • Bourbon Carmel apple (apples from Wolfe Orchard)
  • Salted caramel
  • Hazelnut
  • Local grape sorbetto (made with MI seedless grapes)
  • Pumpkin (from the Great Pumpkin Patch)
  • Toasted coconut - limited
  • Honey peanut brittle - limited
  • Gingersnap - limited 

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 10/27/2016 9:19pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

Mind over matter; I haven’t really had much time to ponder the significance of this phrase since February.  When the body is in constant motion for months on end, the mind plays tricks on the matter of flesh and bones.  The mind convinces the body that it must keep moving with six hours of sleep. The mind refutes the eyelids’ protestations to stay open when they really want to close. The mind trains the body to ignore those twinges in the lower back when hoisting 50-70 pound coolers full of cheese or gelato into the pick-up for market.  I liken the state of a farmer in season to a shark in the deep blue ocean; we both must keep moving to stay alive. 

When the season starts to loosen its grip (usually happens right about this time of year, as outdoor markets end and the flow of late lactation milk slows to a trickle), the body and mind have time to argue.  It’s time for the bones to talk, to express their fatigue. It’s time for the muscles to grip the flesh, and for the mind to acknowledge the tugging sensation. It’s time to indulge the desire to cook cool-weather soups.  It’s time to resist the urge to jump out of bed when the alarm goes off; eyelids stay closed while the daily news drones on from the bedside radio.   

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: This is the last weekend for fall open hours.  We are open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm October, 28-30. Thereafter, we’ll be closed until the week before Thanksgiving, as we get the shop ready for holiday sales.  We still have lots of great things for you to buy—cheese, gelato, meats, sausages, eggs, cider, goat milk soap.  Come out and enjoy the remnants of fall at the farm. The weather should be nice enough to sit outside and enjoy a scoop of gelato. 

Farm Dinners:  The last dinner of the season, “Fall Feast” on October 29th with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago) still has seats open. THAT'S THIS SATURDAY! Check out the scrumptious menu and book your reservations NOW

Fall Classes and Workshops: We’re always learning here at the farm, and we love to share what we’ve learned with our community. We are offering a couple of all-day cheese making classes and a couple of Wednesday evening workshops on understanding cheese and cheese pairings.  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. The cheese making classes are limited to 7 participants only, and the other classes will involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too.  We’re almost sold out of the first cheese making class (three spots left), but there are plenty of spaces open for the December class.

Small Dairy Intensive: We’re partnering with The Land Connection to offer an all-day workshop on starting a small-scale dairy in Illinois (Sunday December 4th). For those of you thinking you’d like to milk cows or goats or even sheep and sell farmstead dairy products (including raw milk) legally and safely in Illinois, this workshop is for you. Most of the presenters are dairy farmers who are already doing it successfully.  Check out the details and register now! Space is limited. 

Market News

Saturday, October 29th is the last outdoor market for Green City Market in Chicago. We will be there as well as the Market at the Square in Urbana (which has one more outdoor market before it moves inside Lincoln Square Mall).  We will not return to Green City Market until November 19th, so if you want our cheese, especially the bloomies, act now!   Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine; tangy and crumbly, it compliments any roasted fall vegetables you care to try it with. 
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; the last batch of the season.
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-starting to get a nice gooey layer on the edges—just how I like it.
  • Black Goat: our ash-ripened bloomy rind is back—fudgy and dense, it’s simply delicious. This is the last batch of the season.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors.
  • Yogurt: Limited quantities, so come early.

We still have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato: We still have way too many flavors, and I honestly love them all. We won’t be sending gelato to Green City Market, but Urbana gets the motherlode:

Urbana’s Market at the Square

  • Grape two ways or Grape Cava Sorbetto
  • Peach-Bourbon Sorbetto
  • Pumpkin
  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Espresso
  • Gingersnap
  • Masala chai
  • Toasted coconut
  • Salted caramel swirl
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Honey peanut brittle
  • Biscotti Crumble (limited

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 10/20/2016 10:28pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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 Farm News

It is difficult to artificially inseminate a goat.  In the world of production animal medicine, everything is gauged relative to a cow.  With cows, a person can practically put their hand through the cervix and lay the semen straw in the uterus (well, maybe that's a slight exaggeration). Most dairy cows are impregnated artificially these days; pregnancy by bull has become almost obsolete.  With goats, openings are very narrow, and navigating the cervical rings with a very thin sheath takes a steady hand.  Success rates are often less than 50%.

You may be wondering why, if it’s so difficult, we don’t just leave the job of procreation to the bucks.  For the most part, we do. However, there are a few instances when it makes sense for us to try attempt artificial insemination: to bring in new genetics without adding more breeding males and when some of bucks (or bucklings in this case) just aren’t up to the job.  We’ve been keeping several straws of semen under liquid nitrogen deep freeze for these special occasions.

Erica, our herd manager, traveled to Oklahoma a few weeks ago to learn how to artificially inseminate goats. Eager to put her newfound skills to the test, we’ve been watching several doe candidates to catch them when they come into heat.  Yesterday afternoon, we noticed that one of our star milkers, Cecilia, was flagging (does wave their tails vigorously when they’re in heat as a way to attract attention of their betrothed). Since we don’t use any breeding hormones to synchronize our does’ heat cycles, we seized the opportunity to give the straws a try.  As Cecilia nibbled quietly on her grain, Erica deftly inserted the speculum equipped with a mini-light, warmed up the sheath (we women appreciate this added touch), strapped in the semen straw, and attempted to navigate the cervical rings.  

Cecilia eating grain

The cervix has five rings before reaching the opening into the uterus.  From what they tell me, getting the sheath through these rings is akin to driving an alfa romeo on a windy road along the bumpy Italian alps.  You’ve got to slide the sheath over the speed bumps (aka the rings) ever so gently to get the prized deposition spot.  The more rings you can get through, the better chance of the sperm reaching their final destination.  Erica was able to get two straws’ worth lodged successfully. We’ll keep all body parts crossed for the next 21 days and hope for the best.

inserting the sheath

Farm Happenings The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: We are open Friday- and Sunday, 1-4 pm this weekend, October 21st and 23rd. The store will NOT be open Saturday October 22nd because we are hosting The Land Connection’s Farm Beginnings Class all day that day. We still have lots of great things for you to buy—cheese, gelato, meats, sausages, eggs, cider, goat milk soap.  We just got a fresh shipment of goat milk soaps, so come check them out. The farm will be closed in early November as we get the Farm Store spruced up for the Holiday Season. Stay tuned for details. 

Farm Dinners:  The last dinner of the season, “Fall Feast” on October 29th with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago) still has seats open. Check out the scrumptious menu and book your reservations NOW.

Fall Classes and Workshops: Now that the weather has cooled off and we’re not quite so busy, we are offering a couple of all-day cheese making classes and a couple of Wednesday evening workshops on understanding cheese and cheese pairings.  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. The cheese making classes are limited to 7 participants only, and the other classes will involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too.  We’re almost sold out of the first cheese making class (three spots left), but there are plenty of spaces open for the December class.

Market News It’s shaping up to be a gorgeous cool fall day on Saturday, so come out and support your farmers. We will be attending two markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, and Chicago’s Green City Market.  There are only two outdoor markets left for Chicago and three for Urbana. For those of you in Bloomington-Normal, we won’t be returning to the outdoor market, but we plan to be there for the “Pre-Thanksgiving” indoor market on November 19th.   Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine; although you may think feta season is over, think again. Feta is a great way to finish roasted root vegetables or a hearty stew or chili. 
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; this batch is young, and firm, but very flavorful.
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-this latest batch is also young
  • Black Goat: our ash-ripened bloomy rind is back—also young
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors.
  • Yogurt: We will only have yogurt for another couple of weeks, so come early if you want some.

We still have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato: I love to eat gelato when the weather gets crisp and cool. Check out the flavors:

Urbana’s Market at the Square

  • Grape two ways or Grape Cava Sorbetto
  • Peach-Bourbon Sorbetto
  • Pumpkin
  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Espresso
  • Gingersnap
  • Masala chai
  • Toasted coconut
  • Salted caramel swirl
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Lemon Verbena
  • Honey peanut brittle – limited

Green city market

  • Pumpkin
  • Grape two ways Sorbetto—this is made with delicious seedless grapes from Klug Farm and Sauvignon Blanc wine
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Salted caramel swirl
  • Honey Peanut Brittle 

 


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 10/13/2016 10:54pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

Appropriate fall is upon the farm. The sun’s warmth is limited and now welcome; it comes late in the morning and diminishes in the short afternoon. We haven’t had a frost yet, but our tomatoes look sad clinging to their withering vines.  The remaining okra stand tall, giant pods still cling to the stems, as we’ve become too lazy to pick anymore.  The winter squash are finally starting to ripen and the last of our dry beans are ready to shell.  Our fall greens have sprouted and seem to relish the dry cool nights. The smell of goat breeding wafts through the air around the barns and makes its way toward the house when the wind blows out of the north. Green is still the predominant color as I pan the landscape around us, but the tips of leaves are turning red, orange, yellow and brown. 

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: We are open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm this weekend, October 15th-16th (even though we will be getting ready for our 100 Yard dinner and brunch).  The store will NOT be open Saturday October 22nd because we are hosting The Land Connection’s Farm Beginnings Class all day that day. We still have lots of great things for you to buy—cheese, gelato, meats, sausages, eggs, cider, goat milk soapComing in November: we’ll be sprucing up the shop for holiday sales in November-December. Stay tuned for details.  

Farm Dinners:  We have a few seats left for the 100 Yard Brunch on Sunday, October 16th.  We also have several seats open for the grand finale dinner of the season, “Fall Feast” on October 29th with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago). The menu is now posted, so go to our website, check it out and book your reservations NOW.

Fall Classes and Workshops: Now that the weather has cooled off and we’re not quite so busy, we are offering a couple of all-day cheese making classes and a couple of Wednesday evening workshops on understanding cheese and cheese pairings.  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. The cheese making classes are limited to 7 participants only, and the other classes will involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too. 

Market News

We will be attending two markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, and Chicago’s Green City Market.  For those of you in Bloomington-Normal, we won’t be returning to the outdoor market, but we plan to be there for the “Pre-Thanksgiving” indoor market on November 19th.   Please support your local farmers by shopping at the farmers’ markets in the fall.  We know a lot of folks are busy, but it’s really the best time of year to find the greatest diversity of farm-fresh products.  Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; this batch is young, and firm, but very flavorful.
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-this latest batch is also young
  • Mocha: this little gooey wonder is a geo-rinded cheese like black goat, but it was rubbed with a little coffee before the white mold covered the rind. It is a special cheese we made just for our CSA members, but we have a few extras that we’re bringing to the markets-first come first served.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish. (Urbana market goers-if you get to the market early, you’ll get to try the special batch that we made with pickled red peppers)
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: Very limited quantities this week, so better come early if you want some.

We still have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato: I love to eat gelato when the weather gets crisp and cool. Check out the flavors:

Urbana’s Market at the Square

  • Grape two ways or Grape Cava Sorbetto
  • Pumpkin-Limited
  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Gingersnap
  • Masala chai
  • Toasted coconut
  • Biscotti crumble – Limited
  • Fresh mint
  • Salted caramel swirl
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Honey peanut brittle – limited
  • Honey chevre – limited

Green city market

  • Pumpkin
  • Grape two ways
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Salted caramel

 


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 10/6/2016 10:47pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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 Farm News

The pairings have been finalized and the doe barn cleaned and organized for four breeding pairs.  Even though we had several days of fall-like weather to get the ladies “in the mood,” the balmy temperatures today had me worried that their hormones would be muted.  My fears were allayed when the bucks were finally brought into the doe barn just before the evening milking.  Within minutes, Harry, Nate and our new Nubian buck “Rick” had mounted at least two does in their respective harems.  Our little La Mancha guy was a bit intimidated by his towering maidens, but soon enough, the does’ desire to dominate will be overcome by their desire to procreate.

As the level of lily-white goat milk drops on the dipstick of our bulk tank, we’ve been looking ahead to making fall-winter milk cheeses with jersey cow milk from our friends at Kilgus Farmstead.  This week, we launched a couple of experimental batches of our “chaorce” style cow milk bloomy (snow fog) and a wash rind cheese.  It’s fun to peer into the cheese vat and see a veneer of golden butterfat covering the surface of the milk.  Even though our goats forage on pasture, their milk fat doesn’t retain the beta-carotene that gives pasture-raised cow milk that lovely “egg-yolk” yellow hue.  The smell of the milk and the feel of the curd are so different between the two milks too.  We should have some of these little cheeses for you to try at the markets in a few weeks.

cow milk cheese

The early stages of our little "washed" rind cow-milk cheese

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: We continue fall hours over the next couple of weekends: Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm only.  Pear Cider pressed right here at the farm is still available as frozen half gallons. In addition, we have the last of our home-grown tomatoes, cheese, gelato, Bane Family Meats and Piemonte Sausages, including goat merguezCome check out our very own pasture-raised “cabrito. We have a variety of cuts for sale, including ground meat, stew meat, shoulder and leg roasts. We also have a fresh supply of our goat milk soaps made by Red Barn Farm. 

Farm Dinners:  Our 2016 Season is drawing to an end. The 100 Yard Dinner in October is now sold out, but we still have plenty of seats for the Brunch on Sunday, October 16th.  We also have several seats open for the Fall Feast with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago) Go to our website, book your reservations NOW.

Stay tuned for upcoming fall classes and workshops at the farm including cheese making, small dairy intensive (with The Land Connection), cheese pairings and more. Also, stay tuned as we "gussy up" our farm store for the holiday season.  

Market News

We will be attending two markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, and Chicago’s Green City Market.  Although it’s warm now, the weather should be down-right cool on Saturday, perfect for loading up on fresh produce, cheese, gelato, and all the other marvels to be found at the markets this time of year.  Please support your local farmers by shopping at the farmers’ markets.  We know a lot of folks get busy in the fall, but it’s really the best time of year to find the greatest diversity of farm-fresh products.  Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper, dried Juliet tomato (this is probably the last week for dried tomato chevre, so first come, first served)
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine—the perfect crumbly texture with a tangy creamy finish-always great for a salad or atop a stew or roasted root vegetables.
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; this batch is young, and firm, but very flavorful.
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-this latest batch is also young
  • Black Goat: ash-ripened with a delicate yeasty rind, also young this week
  • Young Caprino Romano-this “experimental” hard, raw-milk cheese is quite mild but has a lovely, slightly-sharp milky flavor. It’s dry enough to shave or grate too. This is the last week of availability for this cheese, so give it a try.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: both pints and quarts available this week.

We still have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics:  herb flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato is still very much “in season.” We have a great line up of flavors this week, including pumpkin. You shouldn’t have to worry about it melting too fast before you get home, so try some at the market and take home a pint:

Urbana’s Market at the Square

  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Fresh mint
  • Vanilla
  • Salted caramel
  • Toasted coconut
  • Masala chai
  • Pumpkin
  • Grape two ways Sorbetto
  • Gingersnap
  • Honey Peanut brittle

Green City Market

  • Honey chèvre
  • Grape two ways
  • Salted caramel
  • Caramel apple
  • Fresh Mint

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 9/30/2016 8:53am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

While we harvested our very modest “Warthog” wheat crop in July, it’s been sitting in our kid barn waiting to be threshed. Threshing separates the grain from the straw. Over the millenia, there have been many ways to do this, most of them, until our recent machine era, involving manual labor. Gradually, as we realized no one around us would bother harvesting and processing our paltry 1/8th of an acre wheat plot, we became resigned to threshing using stone-age technology, cognizant of the disproportionate labor to product ratio. Dragging our feet (obviously, since the crop was harvested two months ago), we were trying to generate enthusiasm, the deadline of our 100 Yard Dinner needs fast approaching. Then, last week, during an off-hand conversation with our friends from Spence Farm in Fairbury (they grow lots of acres of heirloom grains, including the Warthog variety of wheat we had grown), they offered to help with their grain thresher, the “All Crop.”  This 1940’s era machine was designed to separate grains from many different crop species, from large corn kernels to tiny amaranth seeds.  We set a date, and yesterday, we loaded up our sheaths of wheat and headed north to Fairbury.

threshing wheat

Their 1961 Allis Chalmers tractor (painted a vibrant orange) coupled to the 1940’s All Crop via PTO drive are a testament to the durability and “can-do” attitude of old farm equipment. With a little TLC, these metal work horses complain little and get the job done.  As we gently loaded armfuls of wheat onto the conveyor belt, I marveled at the speed and efficiency with which the All Crop sucked up the sheaths, stripped off the grain and spit out the straw.  Within 30 minutes, our tiny mountain of wheat was converted into a scant bucket-full of wheat berries. 

the harvest

milling

Looking into the bucket, the sad realities of letting the crop sit in our kid barn for way too long began to sink in.  The opportunists had taken advantage of our procrastination: English sparrows, mice, even little pill bugs had gorged themselves on our precious (indeed) grain.  There was even evidence of a goat break out or two. Thankfully, we were able to get enough to mill into flour for our first-ever 100 Yard Dinner bread.  Our ambitions to be grain farmers have been humbling.  We will stick to dairy farming for the time being. 

american gothic

"American Gothic?" I think not!!

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: We are open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm only.  NEW THIS WEEK IN THE STORE:  Pear Cider pressed right here at the farm. We are selling it fresh-frozen, so you can thaw it and enjoy it at your leisure. In addition, we have the last of our home-grown tomatoes,, cheese, gelato, Bane Family Meats and Piemonte Sausages, including goat merguezCome check out our very own pasture-raised “cabrito. We have a variety of cuts for sale, including ground meat, stew meat, shoulder and leg roasts. We also have a fresh supply of our goat milk soaps made by Red Barn Farm. 

Farm Dinners: The 100 Yard Dinner in October is now sold out, but we still have plenty of seats for the Brunch on Sunday, October 16th.  We also have several seats open for the Fall Feast with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago) Go to our website, book your reservations NOW.

CUFarmers: This is the last week of ordering from our multi-farmer, hyper-local buying club, so if you’ve been curious about how this works, this is your last chance for the season.  Order online (opens Friday at 8AM and closes the following Monday at 10 pm) and then pick up your order at the University of IL Research Park on Wednesday afternoon (4-6 pm).  It’s an easy, convenient way to get the best local food around.  Customers love the ease of ordering and the convenient pick up location. We will be evaluating CU Farmers over the winter, and we hope to make it more attractive to potential customers.

Market News

We will be attending three markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, Bloomington’s Farmers’ Market and Chicago’s Green City MarketFor our Bloomington Market goers, we will be attending the market every other Saturday in October. This means we will be there on October 1st and return on October 15th.  The weather should be fall-like, perfect for loading up on fresh produce, cheese, gelato, and all the other marvels to be found at the markets this time of year.  Please support your local farmers by shopping at the farmers’ markets.  We know a lot of folks get busy in the fall, but it’s really the best time of year to find the greatest diversity of farm-fresh products.  Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper, dried Juliet tomato (this flavor will be leaving the repertoire very soon, so stock up now)
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine—the perfect crumbly texture with a tangy creamy finish-always great for a salad or atop a stew as the weather beckons warming comfort foods
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; This batch is young, and firm, but very flavorful
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-this latest batch is also young
  • Black Goat: ash-ripened with a delicate yeasty rind, also young this week (although we do have a few of the really gooey ones for our special customers who love the goo-just ask us)
  • Young Caprino Romano-this “experimental” hard, raw-milk cheese is quite mild but has a lovely, slightly-sharp milky flavor. It’s dry enough to shave or grate too. This is the last week of availability for this cheese, so give it a try.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: Very limited this week at Urbana and Green City Markets only

We have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics) at all three markets:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato is still very much “in season.” We have started to make some fall flavors as well as the standards. You shouldn’t have to worry about it melting too fast before you get home, so try some at the market and take home a pint:

  • Biscotti Crumble
  • Fresh Mint
  • Gingersnap
  • Masala Chai
  • Vanilla
  • Salted Caramel Swirl
  • Grape 2 Ways Sorbetto
  • Pumpkin
  • Honey Peanut Brittle Crunch
  • Chocolate

Limited Flavors

  • Espresso
  • Honey Chevre
  • Spiced Butter Pecan
  • Peach Cardamom (Green City Market only)
  • Lemon Verbena (Green City Market only)
  • Caramel Apple (Green City Market only)

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 9/22/2016 9:12pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

It feels wrong to draw blood samples from our goats for the “fall bleed” in shorts and a tank top.  It is surreal to watch the dust hover over harvesting soybeans when the mercury reads 90. It is jarring to find chickens dead from heat stroke during the week of the waning harvest moon. 

Fall cues compete for prominence amidst the persistent summer.  The giant, super-predatory orb spiders have set up webs amidst the prolific green vegetation of tomatoes, herbs and flowers. 

orb spider

An explosion of praying mantids take cover on tree trunks, screen doors and flower pots, stealthily awaiting the myriad of passing victims (still, so many flies).

mantis

Giant bumble bees take advantage of the late blooms of Celosia to stock up on pollen and nectar.  Monarch butterflies have begun their southward migration, taking respite in our flowery oasis. 

Summer just doesn’t want to let go. Hot, sun-kissed tomatoes taste as sweet as those in July.  The okra pods are as big as Cuban cigars. Winter squash vines continue to set flowers, while the set fruit seems delayed in their ripening.  We aren’t seeing the usual signs of heat cycling in the does, and the co-habiting bucks seem much too cordial for late September.  When your life and livelihood are so tied to the seasons, and you have become accustomed to the looking for, even embracing, the signs of change; the incongruence of summer bleeding into fall is disturbing. 

Farm Happenings The Farm Store “The Real Stand”: The Real Stand is open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm only.  We have our home-grown tomatoes, okra, cheese, gelato, Bane Family Meats and Piemonte Sausages, including goat merguezCome check out our very own pasture-raised “cabrito. We have a variety of cuts for sale, including ground meat, stew meat, shoulder and leg roasts. We also have a fresh supply of our goat milk soaps made by Red Barn Farm.  Of course, there are cheeses, jams, crackers and gelato too.

Farm Dinners:  There are only three farm meals left for the season.  The 100 Yard Dinner in October (also dinner and brunch-check out the menu), and Fall Feast with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant in Chicago) still have seats open as well. Go to our website, book your reservations NOW.

CUFarmers: This is the last week of ordering from our multi-farmer, hyper-local buying club, so if you’ve been curious about how this works, this is your last chance for the season.  Order online (opens Friday at 8AM and closes the following Monday at 10 pm) and then pick up your order at the University of IL Research Park on Wednesday afternoon (4-6 pm).  It’s an easy, convenient way to get the best local food around.  Customers love the ease of ordering and the convenient pick up location. We will be evaluating CU Farmers over the winter, and we hope to make it more attractive to potential customers.

Market News

We will be attending three markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, Bloomington’s Farmers’ Market and Chicago’s Green City Market.  It will be warm again, so come early so you can get your cheese and gelato home before it gets too hot.  Please support your local farmers by shopping at the farmers’ markets.  We know a lot of folks get busy in the fall, but it’s really the best time of year to find the greatest diversity of farm-fresh products.  Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper, dried Juliet tomato
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine—the perfect crumbly texture with a tangy creamy finish-always great for a salad, especially while heirloom tomatoes are still so plentiful
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese.   This batch is fairly ripe, but it’s got a great mushroom flavor
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-try it on a burger while the weather is still hot
  • Black Goat: ash-ripened with a delicate yeasty rind
  • NEW:Young Caprino Romano-this “experimental” hard, raw-milk cheese is quite mild but has a lovely, slightly-sharp milky flavor. It’s dry enough to shave or grate too. We made only one batch, so try some before it’s gone

romano

  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: We will have pints and quarts of our plain, whole-milk yogurt at all three markets this Saturday.

We have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics) at all three markets:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato is still very much “in season. We still have lots of great flavors this week. Try some at the market and take home a pint:

  • Honey-Peanut Brittle Crunch
  • Salted caramel
  • Hazelnut
  • Grape cava
  • Honey chèvre
  • Caramel apple
  • Espresso
  • Peach cardamom cream (Bloomington and Green City Markets only)
  • Spiced Butter Pecan (Bloomington and Green City Markets only)
  • Toasted coconut
  • Masala chai
  • Lemon verbena
  • Chocolate
  • Stracciatella (Bloomington Market only)  
  • Vanilla

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 9/15/2016 11:18pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

As Erica, our herd manager, and I huddled around her laptop computer this week, evaluating lactation curves and breeding outcomes from previous years to develop this year’s breeding plan, our conversation got me thinking about the term “animal husbandry.”  The simple Webster dictionary’s definition is “the science of breeding and caring for farm animals.” As with so much of farming, I find this definition cold, detached and assuming that humans are always in charge. While I appreciate the value of basing decisions on data (for sure, we would be flying blind on our breeding plan if we didn’t have our milk production records to guide us), I have been humbled more frequently than not by acts of nature well beyond my control.

How did this notion of “husbanding” livestock come to be?  I suppose the term has its roots in biblical notions of husband as caretaker, provider. Yes, the paternalist overtones raise the hairs on my feminist neck.  I also know that women across the millennia have played major roles in the care and breeding of the livestock that nourished their families and their tribes.  We women “animal husbands” (animal wives or wifery just sound too weird) embrace the give and take of science and intuition to guide our care of the beings that sustain us.  We usually are the first to notice when one of our critters seems out of sorts. We acknowledge the limits of our knowledge and admit readily when the data fall short of telling the full story.  We feel both comfort and ambiguity in crossing the fuzzy line between intimacy and hard cold decisions that decide the fates of sentient beings.  I’d like to revise that definition of husbandry to recognize the non-quantifiable ties that bind us to the animals that nourish us. 

Farm Events

Family Friendly Fall Farm Happy Hour NEW! 

TOMORROW EVENING-SEPTEMBER 16TH RAIN OR SHINE (5-7 PM). Come out to the farm, enjoy a little nosh and some drinks on the patio (or in the barn dining room) and let their kids run around the farm and get really tired.  We’ll provide a selection of cheeses, jams, pickles, crackers as well as wines, beers and sodas for you to buy. We’ll also open up the gelato dipping cabinet and offer scoops of gelato.  NO RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. 

The Farm Store “The Real Stand”: The Real Stand is open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm only.  We have our home-grown tomatoes, okra, cheese, gelato, Bane Family Meats and Piemonte Sausages, including goat merguezNEW: Our very own pasture-raised “cabrito. We have a variety of cuts for sale, including ground meat, stew meat, shoulder and leg roasts. We also have a fresh supply of our goat milk soaps made by Red Barn Farm.  Of course, there are cheeses, jams, crackers and gelato too. Come visit the farm and see the changing of the seasons. 

Farm Dinners: We still have a number of seats open for this weekend’s dinner and brunch: Spanish Tapas. If you’ve been thinking about coming, don’t delay.  We’re making a special cocktail for the dinner called the “Smokey Derby” with smoked paprika and Kentucky Bourbon:   should be amazing (as will the actual meal).  The 100 Yard Dinner in October (also dinner and brunch-check out the revised menu), and Fall Feast with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant in Chicago) still have seats open as well. Go to our website, check out the menus and book your reservations NOW.

CUFarmers: We only have two more weeks of ordering, so if you’ve been curious about how this works, please give it a try.  Order online (opens Friday at 8AM and closes the following Monday at 10 pm) and then pick up your order at the University of IL Research Park on Wednesday afternoon.  It’s an easy, convenient way to get the best local food around.  Customers love the ease of ordering and the convenient pick up location.

Market News

We will be attending three markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, Bloomington’s Farmers’ Market and Chicago’s Green City Market.  Although there is rain in the forecast, don’t let that stop you from shopping (the silver lining is that you won’t have to fight the crowds).  This time of year, the produce of summer AND fall is abundant, so come out and support your farmers.  We will also be attending the downtown Champaign Farmers’ Market on Tuesday, September 21st (our last one for the season, although the market continues through October).  Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend and next Tuesday:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper, dried Juliet tomato
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine—the perfect crumbly texture with a tangy creamy finish-always great for a salad or for finishing a stew
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese.  Try cutting it into discs and using it to make a BLT or a caprese salad. 
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style in all its gooey glory
  • Black Goat: ash-ripened with a delicate yeasty rind; this cheese is tasting FANTASTIC right now.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: We will have pints and quarts of our plain, whole-milk yogurt at the Urbana and Green City markets only (short on supply this week)

We have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics) at all three markets:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

The warm fall weather we’re having means gelato is still a great dessert. We have some great new flavors this week, in addition to the great standards. Try some at the market and take home a pint:

  • Salted caramel
  • Hazelnut
  • Grape Cava
  • Honey chèvre
  • Caramel apple
  • Espresso
  • Peach cardamom cream
  • Spiced Butter Pecan
  • Toasted coconut
  • Masala chai
  • Lemon verbena
  • Black current apple mint (limited)
  • Fresh mint (limited)
  • Raspberry Meritage (limited)
  • Stracciatella (limited)
  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla 


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 9/13/2016 1:24pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Hi Folks:
Amazingly, we still have tickets open for our Spanish Tapas themed dinner and brunch this weekend.  These meals are gonna be beyond great, so check out the menus and book your reservations now: 

Saturday, September 17- Sunday, September 18 Spanish Tapas and
Rossejat (rice dish)
Dinner

Seared padron peppers with sea salt, Mini gouda and apricot jam grilled cheese, Smokey Derby cocktail

Sweet pepper, avocado and shrimp toast with saffron crema Charred pear with country ham and basil
Summer corn and Valencia tomato gazpacho  
Heirloom tomato and pickled melon salad with chevre fritter and salad greens
SDC rossejat, charred scallion and pecan picada, garlic allioli, chicken confit, and chard
Plum upside down cake with sherry reduction and PFF salted caramel gelato
$100 per person   
Sunday Brunch
Plum and creme Catalan pastry
Salad greens, honey vinaigrette, shaved PFF magia negra, grapes and pecans
Spanish Breakfast BLT: Farm eggs, lettuce, oven roasted tomato, bacon, smoked paprika aioli with Spanish-style hash browns
$50 per person

Friday, September 16th: Family Friendly Fall Happy Hour at the farm 5-7PM.  Cheese, jams, bread, wine, beer, Homer sodas, wide open spaces for your kids to run around--sounds like a good time, right?
Don't forget that our farm store is open Friday-Sunday 1-4 pm.  We have some new products in our freezer, so come check 'em out.

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 9/8/2016 10:48pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

new header

Farm News

There are times when we celebrate the intrusion of the natural world on our farm. We welcome the explosion of insects that pollinate our flowers and predate our pests.  We rejoice at the sight of hummingbirds fighting for nectar at the feeder.  We drop our jaws when a bald eagle flies overhead.  Yet, when nature turns against the aims of the farm, we recoil a bit.

the hawk

This past weekend, a juvenile red-tailed hawk swooped into our chicken enclosure in the orchard and killed one of our freedom ranger chickens.  We didn’t witness it come in for the kill, but we found it caught in the fencing, its victim lying nearby.  From the tangled mess of fencing and poultry netting, it was clear that his/her attempt at scoring an easy meal had not been graceful (or successful for that matter). As it tried to show fierceness upon discovery, its eyes could not hide the fear or embarrassment of a foiled attack.  Wes and Dani couldn’t find the remaining chickens at first; miraculously they had escaped the talons of the predator. They scoured the surrounding orchard floor in search of any survivors; they nearly stepped on a large group of poultry huddled close to the ground, feigning death.  Those freedom rangers are pretty smart for a chicken. We now have bird netting covering the top of their enclosure. They are back to foraging for bugs in the grass, albeit a bit more wary of movements overhead.

This year, we decided to plant a couple of varieties of grain amaranth in our garden: Golden and Mayo Indian amaranth. While the farm has more than its share of unwanted amaranth species (pigweed being a major herbaceous pest), we were intrigued by this ancient grain that packs so much nutrition.  The rapid rate at which the seeds germinated and the seedlings pushed their way out of the ground foretold the vigor of these plants. Within weeks, they were reaching toward the sky, growing like their proverbial weed cousins.  They set themselves apart when they started to form gigantic flower clusters of vibrant ruby and amber.  The plants now tower at over 8-10 feet tall, and we have started to collect the seed (grain) for our 100 Yard Dinner.  We hope to collect enough to make polenta for 50 people. The grains are quite small; let’s hope they expand when they’re cooked. 

amaranth

Farmers’ Market News

We will be attending three markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, Bloomington’s Farmers’ Market and Chicago’s Green City Market.  Here’s the selection of cheeses this week:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper, heirloom dried tomato
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine—the perfect crumbly texture with a tangy creamy finish
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese.  Try one with our sweet-savory tomato jam (you choose-red or green)
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style in all its gooey glory
  • Black Goat: ash-ripened with a delicate yeasty rind.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: We will have pints and quarts of our plain, whole-milk yogurt at all markets but supplies are very limited this week.

We have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics) at all three markets:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses. We also have house-made tomato jam to complete the cheese & cracker pairing.

Gelato season isn’t over yet. Try some at the market and take home a pint:

  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Vanilla
  • Stracciatella-fancy chocolate ganache chip
  • Salted Caramel Swirl
  • Honey Chevre
  • Spiced Butter Pecan
  • Raspberry Meritage
  • Peach-Cardamom-Cream
  • Black Currant-Apple Mint (very limited)
  • Fresh Mint (very limited)

The Farm Store “The Real Stand”: This week, The Real Stand is open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm only.  We have our home-grown tomatoes, okra, cheese, gelato, Bane Family Meats and Piemonte Sausages, including goat merguez.  NEW: Our very own pasture-raised “cabrito.” We have a variety of cuts for sale. We also have a fresh supply of our goat milk soaps made by Red Barn Farm.  Of course, there are cheeses, jams, crackers and gelato too. Come visit the farm and see the changing of the seasons. 

Family Friendly Fall Farm Happy Hour:  NEW! We’ve been asked to have a time when families can come out to the farm, enjoy a little nosh and some drinks on the patio and let their kids run around the farm and get really tired.  So, come out to the farm next Friday, September 16th from 5-7 pm. We’ll provide a selection of cheeses, jams, pickles, crackers as well as wines, beers and sodas for you to buy. We’ll also open up the gelato dipping cabinet and offer scoops of gelato.  NO RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. 

CUFarmers: Order online (opens Friday at 8AM and closes the following Monday at 10 pm) and then pick up your order at the University of IL Research Park on Wednesday afternoon.  It’s an easy, convenient way to get the best local food around.  We are continuing this service through the end of September, so we encourage you to give it a try if you haven’t already. Customers love the ease of ordering and the convenient pick up location.

Farm Dinners: Three dates remain for the season: Spanish Tapas in September (dinner and brunch actually—next weekend), The 100 Yard Dinner in October (also dinner and brunch-check out the revised menu), and Fall Feast with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant in Chicago). Tickets are going fast, so go to our website, check out the menus and book your reservations NOW.

farm food

CU Artisan Cup: Sunday, October 23rd, 6-8 PM. A friendly competition among Central IL chefs to celebrate the bounty of local foods and raise funds for The Land Connection, a non-profit organization dedicated to connecting farmers to land, consumers to sustainable farmers and farmer training. It’s going to be a very special evening, and Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery will be there at the “cheese table.”  Check out the details for the event. Tickets are on sale at www.artisancup.com  


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.